For Ruth

Source: clipartbest.com

Source: clipartbest.com

I recently lost a friend. I met her through the  Toastmaster’s (public speaking) organization. 

We worked together on several projects over the years and got to know each other well. Sometimes we had lunch.

A great speaker with a smooth voice, she did voice-overs part-time and a lot of other things too. Occasionally I would hear her on commercials.

She was a free spirit, very laid back and the perennial hippie all rolled into one.

I don’t think I ever saw her outside of jeans. Her hairdos were always a no-fuss style with little to no make-up. 

She co-authored a book and was an avid reader, hosting functions and encouraging others.

She was a great friend. She read and commented on my blog especially at the beginning when I had two readers. In return I edited her book.

During her illness she maintained a blog on caringbridge.org where she posted upbeat accounts of her health and treatments. I don’t think she ever lost hope so I was stunned and saddened when her daughter posted her dire status a few days before her death.

She was a woman of incredible faith and her concern was always for her family. She had no fear of death.

The world will be a sadder place without her. Some people incite memorable stories and she is one of those people. I remember some great “Ruth” stories.

Over the course of our association with Toastmasters, I heard her speak many times. Another Toastmaster reminded me of an unusual speech she gave about dying.

She had an envelope labeled “if I die.” In it along with “those” important papers she had a photo for her obituary so her family would use a “good” one.

Nope, she did not want her high school graduation photo or a snapshot in a swimsuit. She was in her 40s at the time of the speech. Who thinks like that?

I wasn’t surprised to see her obituary accompanied by a great head shot along with accurate details of her interests and accomplishments. Even in the end she was in charge and directing things.

For Ruth, peace.

 

42 thoughts on “For Ruth

  1. It’s a beautiful tribute. And must have been hard to write while you still hurt from the loss. Death at any age is difficult for the survivors. Death at 53 simply shouldn’t be. Ruth seems to have impressed you very much as long as she lived. I’m sure her memory will remain with you as long as you do. But for right now, I’m so sorry….

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  2. I’m sorry to hear of the loss of your friend. Your kind words are a lovely way to remember those things that were unique and admirable, and she certainly sounds like someone who would be interesting to have known. As with every season of life, it can be tough to adjust to a world without certain people in it, but thankfully, we can hold on to our memories, and let those memories put a smile in our heart. As you said yourself, death has no calendar. Prayers for her family, and also, for you. Sorry for your loss.

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  3. Such a beautiful tribute to your friend, Kate. I’m sorry for your loss. Just this morning, I learned that my coworker’s wife died suddenly early yesterday, she hadn’t been ill and was in her early 50’s. Life is so fragile…

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  4. Helen Keller is quoted…’So long as the memory of certain beloved friends lives in my heart, I shall say that life is good’.
    There are people…and then, there are ‘special’ people; people like Ruth that you’ve written of so beautifully. I’m sure she is smiling.
    Thank you…you are loved…and life is good.

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  5. We have friends and then friends who really make an impression/impact on us. Your writeup sounds like she was special to many who met her. I have a few acquaintances like that and fortunately they are still around.

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  6. Kate,
    That was indeed a lovely tribute to your friend. I hope her family sees it. You had a great friendship and I am glad you have wonderful memories of her. May she rest in peace.

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